Brian O'Shea, Ph.D.

Brian O'Shea, Ph.D.

Marie Skłodowska Curie Global Fellow, Department of Psychology
Harvard University and the University of Amsterdam
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Brian’s research critiques existing measures used to estimate automatic/implicit biases (e.g., prejudice towards outgroups). He has designed two new implicit measures (Simple Implicit Procedure: SIP & Spatial Association Task: SAT) and has demonstrated their advantages over the current “gold standard” implicit tasks. He also uses “big data” to explain factors that exacerbate prejudice (e.g., disease rates/segregation) towards stigmatized groups (e.g., immigrants/minorities) both across and within countries/cultures. As part of his Marie Curie Global Fellowship, he will spend two years at Project Implicit, working in Professor Matthew Nock’s Lab as well as being affiliated with Professor Mahzarin Banaji’s lab. Here he will use the SIP to predict those most likely to attempt suicide and self-harm. The SIP can be used to precisely specify the cognitive mechanisms that are driving an automatic bias, which will offer researchers across a host of domains crucial additional information. This additional insight will be used to assist with the development of interventions aimed at reducing problematic behaviours or thoughts. Following this period at Harvard University, he will return to the University of Amsterdam to work in the Adapt Lab with Professor Reinout Wiers to measure the utility of the SIP in areas such as addiction, depression and anxiety. Brian completed an International Psychology B.A. at the National University of Ireland, Galway and the University of Ottawa. He also holds an M.Sc. in Social and Cultural Psychology from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Brian completed his Ph.D. in Experimental Social Psychology in 2017 from the University of Warwick.

Curriculum Vitae

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